The forbidden flesh: Cultural meanings of humans, animals, and the natural world

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278466
Title:
The forbidden flesh: Cultural meanings of humans, animals, and the natural world
Author:
Loftsdóttir, Kristín, 1968-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Humans have tried to separate themselves from nature and to gain an understanding of what it means to be human, through studies of nature. Ideas of human nature have political and ideological implications, and are thus important in providing information about what it means to be human and what the relation to animals and the environment "ought" to be like. The ideology of human nature makes the world hence meaningful and points out what kind of actions regarding environmental issues are appropriate. The understanding of human nature and the human relationship with nature is culturally and historically produced. Humans' cultural conception thus also influences what kind of relationships are seen as desirable with particular animals. Different animals are seen as having different relations to humans, relations in which all animals are not seen as being equal. Some animals are defined edible, others are defined as companions.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Ecology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe forbidden flesh: Cultural meanings of humans, animals, and the natural worlden_US
dc.creatorLoftsdóttir, Kristín, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLoftsdóttir, Kristín, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHumans have tried to separate themselves from nature and to gain an understanding of what it means to be human, through studies of nature. Ideas of human nature have political and ideological implications, and are thus important in providing information about what it means to be human and what the relation to animals and the environment "ought" to be like. The ideology of human nature makes the world hence meaningful and points out what kind of actions regarding environmental issues are appropriate. The understanding of human nature and the human relationship with nature is culturally and historically produced. Humans' cultural conception thus also influences what kind of relationships are seen as desirable with particular animals. Different animals are seen as having different relations to humans, relations in which all animals are not seen as being equal. Some animals are defined edible, others are defined as companions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1361573en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33045112en_US
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