"Its future beyond prophecythe City of New Jersey, worthy sister of New York": John Cotton Dana's vision for the Newark Museum, 1909-1929

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278461
Title:
"Its future beyond prophecythe City of New Jersey, worthy sister of New York": John Cotton Dana's vision for the Newark Museum, 1909-1929
Author:
Shiffrar, Genevieve Ruth, 1966-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A member of America's established cultural elite, John Cotton Dana (1856-1929) aimed to wrest cultural and economic authority from the nouveau riche through his role as the first director of the Newark Museum. In his favorite exhibition, "New Jersey Textiles," he encouraged local immigrant laborers to improve the design of goods that he simultaneously prompted middle-class women to purchase. He imagined that, as a result, Newark's manufacturing sector would blossom without nouveau-riche involvement; the region would soon rival its new-money neighbor, New York City. Under Dana's supervision, Jarvis Hunt (1859-1941) designed the 1926 Newark Museum building, employing the conventions of contemporary office architecture (predating a similar strategy at the Museum of Modern Art) to articulate this vision. The Metropolitan Museum of Art designed a series of exhibitions indebted to Dana's ideas. Ironically, the Metropolitan has received credit for innovations that Dana had designed to challenge New York's preeminence.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Architecture.; Art History.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Art
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"Its future beyond prophecythe City of New Jersey, worthy sister of New York": John Cotton Dana's vision for the Newark Museum, 1909-1929en_US
dc.creatorShiffrar, Genevieve Ruth, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorShiffrar, Genevieve Ruth, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA member of America's established cultural elite, John Cotton Dana (1856-1929) aimed to wrest cultural and economic authority from the nouveau riche through his role as the first director of the Newark Museum. In his favorite exhibition, "New Jersey Textiles," he encouraged local immigrant laborers to improve the design of goods that he simultaneously prompted middle-class women to purchase. He imagined that, as a result, Newark's manufacturing sector would blossom without nouveau-riche involvement; the region would soon rival its new-money neighbor, New York City. Under Dana's supervision, Jarvis Hunt (1859-1941) designed the 1926 Newark Museum building, employing the conventions of contemporary office architecture (predating a similar strategy at the Museum of Modern Art) to articulate this vision. The Metropolitan Museum of Art designed a series of exhibitions indebted to Dana's ideas. Ironically, the Metropolitan has received credit for innovations that Dana had designed to challenge New York's preeminence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1361564en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3303462xen_US
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