The use of supplemental foods by participants in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278451
Title:
The use of supplemental foods by participants in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)
Author:
Keys, Marilyn Contri, 1953-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) have operated for years, little is known about utilization of program foods by participants. Using ethnographic interviews, this study examined food use, factors affecting use, and satisfaction among WIC and CSFP clients. WIC foods were consumed by most participants, but frequently not in the total amount. Four of seven WIC foods were found to be substitutions for foods previously consumed. CSFP foods were consumed less frequently, and in smaller amounts, than WIC foods. Intra-household sharing, but not substitution, was prevalent. Major factors affecting food use were taste preference, food habit, convenience, amount and knowledge. Clients expressed greater satisfaction with WIC versus CSFP foods. The results indicate that provision of supplemental foods does not guarantee use, and that significant barriers to use exist. Nutrition education is recommended as a means of increasing food use.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutrition and food science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheehan, Edward T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe use of supplemental foods by participants in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)en_US
dc.creatorKeys, Marilyn Contri, 1953-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeys, Marilyn Contri, 1953-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) have operated for years, little is known about utilization of program foods by participants. Using ethnographic interviews, this study examined food use, factors affecting use, and satisfaction among WIC and CSFP clients. WIC foods were consumed by most participants, but frequently not in the total amount. Four of seven WIC foods were found to be substitutions for foods previously consumed. CSFP foods were consumed less frequently, and in smaller amounts, than WIC foods. Intra-household sharing, but not substitution, was prevalent. Major factors affecting food use were taste preference, food habit, convenience, amount and knowledge. Clients expressed greater satisfaction with WIC versus CSFP foods. The results indicate that provision of supplemental foods does not guarantee use, and that significant barriers to use exist. Nutrition education is recommended as a means of increasing food use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition and food scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheehan, Edward T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1360249en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b32578131en_US
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