Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278435
Title:
Habitat use by breeding male Northern Goshawks in northern Arizona
Author:
Bright-Smith, Donald Joseph
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I radio-tagged and followed 5 and 9 male Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis atricapillus) during the breeding seasons of 1991 and 1992, respectively, to evaluate their use of different forest conditions in managed ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. Sufficient data for habitat analyses were collected for 11 birds. Minimum convex polygon home-ranges averaged 1,758 ha (SD = 500 ha, range 896-2528 ha) and harmonic mean home ranges averaged 1,530 ha (SD = 477 ha, range 859-2,321 ha). I compared use (i.e., number of hawk locations) and availability (i.e., % of area of home range) for three different forest conditions (canopy closure, edge, and diversity) generated from LANDSAT data. Most (≥6) of the 11 birds used the categories in the three overlays in proportion to their availability. Six of the 11 birds used at least one category on one of the overlays nonrandomly. When the categories of canopy closure were ranked for each bird on the basis of relative preference, these ranks increased with increasing canopy closure.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHabitat use by breeding male Northern Goshawks in northern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorBright-Smith, Donald Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBright-Smith, Donald Josephen_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI radio-tagged and followed 5 and 9 male Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis atricapillus) during the breeding seasons of 1991 and 1992, respectively, to evaluate their use of different forest conditions in managed ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. Sufficient data for habitat analyses were collected for 11 birds. Minimum convex polygon home-ranges averaged 1,758 ha (SD = 500 ha, range 896-2528 ha) and harmonic mean home ranges averaged 1,530 ha (SD = 477 ha, range 859-2,321 ha). I compared use (i.e., number of hawk locations) and availability (i.e., % of area of home range) for three different forest conditions (canopy closure, edge, and diversity) generated from LANDSAT data. Most (≥6) of the 11 birds used the categories in the three overlays in proportion to their availability. Six of the 11 birds used at least one category on one of the overlays nonrandomly. When the categories of canopy closure were ranked for each bird on the basis of relative preference, these ranks increased with increasing canopy closure.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358105en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33629225en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b32010175en_US
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