For the benefit of Indian peoples: An analysis of Indian land consolidation policy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278432
Title:
For the benefit of Indian peoples: An analysis of Indian land consolidation policy
Author:
Di Giulio, Jo Ann, 1964-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As a result of the allotment of Indian reservation land during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, land on reservations today is severely checkerboarded and fractionated, making its productive use virtually impossible. Complicating productive land use is the status of land tenure on reservations, which may be classified into as many as seven tenures: Indian trust land; Indian fee land; tribal trust land; tribal fee; non-Indian land; federal trust land, and state land. Congress has attempted to reconcile fractionation and checkerboarding for the past eighty years, yet with little success. In 1983, Congress passed the Indian Land Consolidation Act (ILCA) to enable tribes to consolidate their land holdings and reduce fractionated land parcels. However, this act has failed to accomplish its goals. Rather than eliminating fractionation and checkerboarding, the act has succeeded only in complicating the devise and descent of Indian lands.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Robert A., Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFor the benefit of Indian peoples: An analysis of Indian land consolidation policyen_US
dc.creatorDi Giulio, Jo Ann, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDi Giulio, Jo Ann, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs a result of the allotment of Indian reservation land during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, land on reservations today is severely checkerboarded and fractionated, making its productive use virtually impossible. Complicating productive land use is the status of land tenure on reservations, which may be classified into as many as seven tenures: Indian trust land; Indian fee land; tribal trust land; tribal fee; non-Indian land; federal trust land, and state land. Congress has attempted to reconcile fractionation and checkerboarding for the past eighty years, yet with little success. In 1983, Congress passed the Indian Land Consolidation Act (ILCA) to enable tribes to consolidate their land holdings and reduce fractionated land parcels. However, this act has failed to accomplish its goals. Rather than eliminating fractionation and checkerboarding, the act has succeeded only in complicating the devise and descent of Indian lands.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert A., Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358100en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b32007759en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.