Movements, activity patterns and habitat use of Boiga irregularis (Colubridae), an introduced predator in the island of Guam

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278430
Title:
Movements, activity patterns and habitat use of Boiga irregularis (Colubridae), an introduced predator in the island of Guam
Author:
Santana-Bendix, Manuel Alberto, 1956-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Boiga irregularis has caused the extinction of several native vertebrate species on the island of Guam. Information on movement is critical to the management of the species. B. irregularis is active at night and spends daylight hours in secluded refuges (from 10 m up in the forest canopy to 1 m underground). There appears to be no preferences for any particular refuge type. Nighttime movement (distance) was related to distances between daytime refugia. The average net movement ranged from 26.9-97.7 m/day (N = 11). The maximum distance moved from the first daytime location following release to subsequent locations ranged from 142.8-1809.4 m. The activity area (minimum convex polygon) ranged from 1.9-99 ha; the cumulative activity area periodically increased and did not reach an asymptote. Direction of snake movements were random. The data suggest that Boiga lacks a defined activity area, and moves randomly and continuously searching for resources.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Zoology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maughan, O. Eugene

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMovements, activity patterns and habitat use of Boiga irregularis (Colubridae), an introduced predator in the island of Guamen_US
dc.creatorSantana-Bendix, Manuel Alberto, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSantana-Bendix, Manuel Alberto, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBoiga irregularis has caused the extinction of several native vertebrate species on the island of Guam. Information on movement is critical to the management of the species. B. irregularis is active at night and spends daylight hours in secluded refuges (from 10 m up in the forest canopy to 1 m underground). There appears to be no preferences for any particular refuge type. Nighttime movement (distance) was related to distances between daytime refugia. The average net movement ranged from 26.9-97.7 m/day (N = 11). The maximum distance moved from the first daytime location following release to subsequent locations ranged from 142.8-1809.4 m. The activity area (minimum convex polygon) ranged from 1.9-99 ha; the cumulative activity area periodically increased and did not reach an asymptote. Direction of snake movements were random. The data suggest that Boiga lacks a defined activity area, and moves randomly and continuously searching for resources.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaughan, O. Eugeneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358095en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31998926en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.