Mexican-American women in professional careers: The price of success

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278424
Title:
Mexican-American women in professional careers: The price of success
Author:
Serrano, Laura Anna, 1966-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explored the most critical problems encountered by Mexican-American women in professional careers. These women were employed in art, science, engineering, education, medicine, law, writing, and administrative and managerial specialties. Both single (N = 38) and married (N = 33) women participated in this study. There were no restrictions on age, number of years on the job, or educational level. A questionnaire designed by the researcher was used to gather information on the subjects. The questionnaire was divided into three parts: Part 1 solicited demographic information, Part 2 addressed issues encountered in the workplace, and Part 3 examined issues encountered at home. Findings from the study indicated that the most critical problems encountered by Mexican-American women in the workplace included the "Superwoman complex," being the "only," and establishing legitimacy. At home, crucial issues consisted of the Superwoman complex, self-imposed guilt/torment, and family pressure. Additional questions revealed critical problems encountered by these women.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Education, Vocational.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and consumer resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMexican-American women in professional careers: The price of successen_US
dc.creatorSerrano, Laura Anna, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, Laura Anna, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the most critical problems encountered by Mexican-American women in professional careers. These women were employed in art, science, engineering, education, medicine, law, writing, and administrative and managerial specialties. Both single (N = 38) and married (N = 33) women participated in this study. There were no restrictions on age, number of years on the job, or educational level. A questionnaire designed by the researcher was used to gather information on the subjects. The questionnaire was divided into three parts: Part 1 solicited demographic information, Part 2 addressed issues encountered in the workplace, and Part 3 examined issues encountered at home. Findings from the study indicated that the most critical problems encountered by Mexican-American women in the workplace included the "Superwoman complex," being the "only," and establishing legitimacy. At home, crucial issues consisted of the Superwoman complex, self-imposed guilt/torment, and family pressure. Additional questions revealed critical problems encountered by these women.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Vocational.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and consumer resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357308en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31929606en_US
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