O'odham ki: The development of a theme residence and its effect on American Indian students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278420
Title:
O'odham ki: The development of a theme residence and its effect on American Indian students
Author:
Mason, Julia Marie, 1970-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
American Indian students have historically been underrepresented in higher education. Graduation and persistence rates for American Indians are distressingly low. Increasing Indian student retention has become a priority on many campuses. At the University of Arizona, a wing within a residence hall was reserved for American Indian students as part of a recruitment and retention program. The purpose of this thesis was to describe and assess the history, development and implementation of the American Indian wing. All of the traditional predictors for academic success show that the residents of the wing were at risk for dropping out of college. All of the first year students who lived on the wing were enrolled in Spring 1994. Given this important indicator the wing was a success. The American Indian wing was the beginning of a retention program that encourages Indians to remain at college without compromising cultural values.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stauss, Joseph A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleO'odham ki: The development of a theme residence and its effect on American Indian studentsen_US
dc.creatorMason, Julia Marie, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMason, Julia Marie, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmerican Indian students have historically been underrepresented in higher education. Graduation and persistence rates for American Indians are distressingly low. Increasing Indian student retention has become a priority on many campuses. At the University of Arizona, a wing within a residence hall was reserved for American Indian students as part of a recruitment and retention program. The purpose of this thesis was to describe and assess the history, development and implementation of the American Indian wing. All of the traditional predictors for academic success show that the residents of the wing were at risk for dropping out of college. All of the first year students who lived on the wing were enrolled in Spring 1994. Given this important indicator the wing was a success. The American Indian wing was the beginning of a retention program that encourages Indians to remain at college without compromising cultural values.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStauss, Joseph A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357300en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3192606xen_US
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