At home and industriously employed: The Women's National Indian Association

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278412
Title:
At home and industriously employed: The Women's National Indian Association
Author:
Lastowka, Carol Anne Chase, 1968-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Women's National Indian Association (WNIA) organized in 1879 to advocate fair treatment of Native Americans. By manipulating the Victorian ideology of domesticity, the organization was able to send women missionaries to the reservations. Because women could only work "at home," the WNIA redefined the Indian reservation as the missionaries' home. This redefinition ideologically enabled women missionaries to engage in non-traditional work. Conversely, the WNIA believed Indians would only become "civilized" if they moved from traditional dwellings into frame houses. In addition, native houses could only become "homes" if Indian women became ardent housekeepers and converted to Christianity. Accordingly, the WNIA provided financial support to Indians who wished to build houses, and taught the domestic arts to native women and children. In so doing, and by supporting the government's allotment policy, the WNIA participated in the subjugation of Native Americans and in the westward expansion of the United States.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Religion, History of.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Women's Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hill, Jane H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAt home and industriously employed: The Women's National Indian Associationen_US
dc.creatorLastowka, Carol Anne Chase, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLastowka, Carol Anne Chase, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Women's National Indian Association (WNIA) organized in 1879 to advocate fair treatment of Native Americans. By manipulating the Victorian ideology of domesticity, the organization was able to send women missionaries to the reservations. Because women could only work "at home," the WNIA redefined the Indian reservation as the missionaries' home. This redefinition ideologically enabled women missionaries to engage in non-traditional work. Conversely, the WNIA believed Indians would only become "civilized" if they moved from traditional dwellings into frame houses. In addition, native houses could only become "homes" if Indian women became ardent housekeepers and converted to Christianity. Accordingly, the WNIA provided financial support to Indians who wished to build houses, and taught the domestic arts to native women and children. In so doing, and by supporting the government's allotment policy, the WNIA participated in the subjugation of Native Americans and in the westward expansion of the United States.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReligion, History of.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHill, Jane H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357286en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31913751en_US
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