Gravity bubbler irrigation systems on steep slopes converted to bench terraces

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278410
Title:
Gravity bubbler irrigation systems on steep slopes converted to bench terraces
Author:
Abdulhussain, Mohamed Fidahussain, 1964-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Gravity bubbler irrigation is a new mode of irrigation activated by the existing pressure in conventional irrigation supply channels. In gravity flow systems on steep slopes, pressure increases in the downstream sections of the pipe and must be dissipated for uniform application. A design procedure for gravity bubbler irrigation systems on inclined steep slopes or converted to bench terrace systems is described in detail. The design is based on the use of orifices as energy dissipating devices. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine graphical relationships and coefficients for estimating the head loss for an orifice made from PVC. The head loss coefficient is a function of the orifice to pipe diameter ratio and can be expressed by an equation of the form Ko = abetab where a and b are constants determined from test data and beta is the ratio of diameters. A prototype gravity bubbler irrigation system was designed and installed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Agronomy.; Engineering, Agricultural.; Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural and biosystems engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nordby, Gene M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGravity bubbler irrigation systems on steep slopes converted to bench terracesen_US
dc.creatorAbdulhussain, Mohamed Fidahussain, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdulhussain, Mohamed Fidahussain, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGravity bubbler irrigation is a new mode of irrigation activated by the existing pressure in conventional irrigation supply channels. In gravity flow systems on steep slopes, pressure increases in the downstream sections of the pipe and must be dissipated for uniform application. A design procedure for gravity bubbler irrigation systems on inclined steep slopes or converted to bench terrace systems is described in detail. The design is based on the use of orifices as energy dissipating devices. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine graphical relationships and coefficients for estimating the head loss for an orifice made from PVC. The head loss coefficient is a function of the orifice to pipe diameter ratio and can be expressed by an equation of the form Ko = abetab where a and b are constants determined from test data and beta is the ratio of diameters. A prototype gravity bubbler irrigation system was designed and installed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and biosystems engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNordby, Gene M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357284en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31910622en_US
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