Anne Graham Rockfellow: Who was she? What was her contribution to the history of architecture?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278409
Title:
Anne Graham Rockfellow: Who was she? What was her contribution to the history of architecture?
Author:
Kunasek, Kimberly Ann Oei
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Anne Graham Rockfellow, virtually unknown to history, deserves a place worthy of scholarly attention. Rockfellow's significance to the histories of American architecture, of Tucson, and of professional women is explored. She was the first woman architect academically trained at M.I.T. (the first recognized school of architecture in the United States). In the mid-1890s she made her first move to Tucson, Arizona, a growing southwestern town that already had a long history. When Rockfellow permanently relocated to Tucson in 1915, she was hired by the H. O. Jaastad architectural firm, where she remained until her retirement in 1938. In order to put Rockfellow in a historical context, her biography is juxtaposed with the biographies of some of her female contemporaries who also chose to pursue careers in the field of architecture. Her contributions to the architecture of Tucson and to the development of the Spanish Colonial Revival style are also examined.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biography.; Art History.; Women's Studies.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Art
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Van Slyck, Abigail

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAnne Graham Rockfellow: Who was she? What was her contribution to the history of architecture?en_US
dc.creatorKunasek, Kimberly Ann Oeien_US
dc.contributor.authorKunasek, Kimberly Ann Oeien_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAnne Graham Rockfellow, virtually unknown to history, deserves a place worthy of scholarly attention. Rockfellow's significance to the histories of American architecture, of Tucson, and of professional women is explored. She was the first woman architect academically trained at M.I.T. (the first recognized school of architecture in the United States). In the mid-1890s she made her first move to Tucson, Arizona, a growing southwestern town that already had a long history. When Rockfellow permanently relocated to Tucson in 1915, she was hired by the H. O. Jaastad architectural firm, where she remained until her retirement in 1938. In order to put Rockfellow in a historical context, her biography is juxtaposed with the biographies of some of her female contemporaries who also chose to pursue careers in the field of architecture. Her contributions to the architecture of Tucson and to the development of the Spanish Colonial Revival style are also examined.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVan Slyck, Abigailen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357283en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31910178en_US
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