Survival distancing: A grounded theory of living with HIV infection in rural areas

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278400
Title:
Survival distancing: A grounded theory of living with HIV infection in rural areas
Author:
Gray, Joel Ronald, 1962-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A disparity of resources for HIV-infected persons exists in rural areas. Unlike any other chronic illness, HIV has no immediate medical intervention until significant disease progression occurs. Lack of curative treatment for a disease process known to induce irrevocable damage to the immune system causes distress, anxiety, and uncertainty. Presently, no theory exists to aid health professionals understand and provide appropriate interventions for these individuals. Considering the negative effects of stress and illness on immune function and the inadequacy of health care services, the purpose of this study was to identify experiences of HIV-infected persons in rural areas. S scURVIVAL D scISTANCING, described experiences by which HIV-infected persons in rural areas balanced limits and accepted the reality of living with chronic illness. Migration of HIV-infected persons, in addition to those indigenous to rural areas, added to challenges in determining health care needs of those infected and needs of those affected by HIV.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Theory and Methods.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Longman, Alice J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSurvival distancing: A grounded theory of living with HIV infection in rural areasen_US
dc.creatorGray, Joel Ronald, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, Joel Ronald, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA disparity of resources for HIV-infected persons exists in rural areas. Unlike any other chronic illness, HIV has no immediate medical intervention until significant disease progression occurs. Lack of curative treatment for a disease process known to induce irrevocable damage to the immune system causes distress, anxiety, and uncertainty. Presently, no theory exists to aid health professionals understand and provide appropriate interventions for these individuals. Considering the negative effects of stress and illness on immune function and the inadequacy of health care services, the purpose of this study was to identify experiences of HIV-infected persons in rural areas. S scURVIVAL D scISTANCING, described experiences by which HIV-infected persons in rural areas balanced limits and accepted the reality of living with chronic illness. Migration of HIV-infected persons, in addition to those indigenous to rural areas, added to challenges in determining health care needs of those infected and needs of those affected by HIV.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Theory and Methods.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLongman, Alice J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357273en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31948157en_US
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