Survival status of elderly nursing home residents following involuntary relocation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278389
Title:
Survival status of elderly nursing home residents following involuntary relocation
Author:
Ehrmann-Vanderbilt, Irine, 1932-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Survival status of 45 elderly skilled nursing care residents was examined over a 42 month period following involuntary interinstitutional relocation. Medical and relocation planning records provided data to examine survival status of residents in relation to focal and contextual stimuli. Results were compared to a relocation study previously conducted in the same community. Significant relationships existed between survival status and family support and participation in relocation planning event. A higher percentage of subjects survived who did not have family support and did not participate in planning events. A significant relationship was found between time intervals in which deaths of male and female subjects occurred. In the first nine months, 13 of 14 males died; six of the 14 females died. No significant relationships were found between survival status and age, gender, mobility, or dementia. Findings suggest the need for continued study of variables affecting survival status of relocated elders.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Psychology, General.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodtli, Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSurvival status of elderly nursing home residents following involuntary relocationen_US
dc.creatorEhrmann-Vanderbilt, Irine, 1932-en_US
dc.contributor.authorEhrmann-Vanderbilt, Irine, 1932-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSurvival status of 45 elderly skilled nursing care residents was examined over a 42 month period following involuntary interinstitutional relocation. Medical and relocation planning records provided data to examine survival status of residents in relation to focal and contextual stimuli. Results were compared to a relocation study previously conducted in the same community. Significant relationships existed between survival status and family support and participation in relocation planning event. A higher percentage of subjects survived who did not have family support and did not participate in planning events. A significant relationship was found between time intervals in which deaths of male and female subjects occurred. In the first nine months, 13 of 14 males died; six of the 14 females died. No significant relationships were found between survival status and age, gender, mobility, or dementia. Findings suggest the need for continued study of variables affecting survival status of relocated elders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodtli, Anneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356813en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31469516en_US
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