Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278386
Title:
Subjective catalyst influencing bulimics to seek treatment
Author:
Gurstell, Stacy Ann, 1969-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explores the subjective catalyst influencing bulimic women to seek psychological treatment, as measured by the Subjective Factors Influencing Bulimics to Seek Treatment self report inventory. The factors addressed in the inventory designed specifically for this study were divided into five categories: Environmental, Thoughts and Behaviors, Emotional, Physical, and Spiritual. Both clinically diagnosed and self diagnosed female subjects participated in this study. The subjects voluntarily completed the anonymous self report inventory designed in a four point Likert format. Additional space was provided to write in any influencing factors on treatment seeking that were not included in the questionnaire. The data was collected, statistically analyzed, and summarized. Results were yielded through means, standard deviations and T-tests. Findings indicated that factors in the Emotional category had the greatest influence on bulimic participants to seek psychological help. The specific questionnaire item that was rated as having the strongest influence was "Hate your body".
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Psychology, General.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and consumer resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSubjective catalyst influencing bulimics to seek treatmenten_US
dc.creatorGurstell, Stacy Ann, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGurstell, Stacy Ann, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the subjective catalyst influencing bulimic women to seek psychological treatment, as measured by the Subjective Factors Influencing Bulimics to Seek Treatment self report inventory. The factors addressed in the inventory designed specifically for this study were divided into five categories: Environmental, Thoughts and Behaviors, Emotional, Physical, and Spiritual. Both clinically diagnosed and self diagnosed female subjects participated in this study. The subjects voluntarily completed the anonymous self report inventory designed in a four point Likert format. Additional space was provided to write in any influencing factors on treatment seeking that were not included in the questionnaire. The data was collected, statistically analyzed, and summarized. Results were yielded through means, standard deviations and T-tests. Findings indicated that factors in the Emotional category had the greatest influence on bulimic participants to seek psychological help. The specific questionnaire item that was rated as having the strongest influence was "Hate your body".en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and consumer resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356806en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31464671en_US
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