Early conservation by the Arizona Federation of Women's Clubs from 1900 to 1932

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278379
Title:
Early conservation by the Arizona Federation of Women's Clubs from 1900 to 1932
Author:
Johnson, Sandra Jeanne, 1968-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Women have been historically written out of human achievement. This is especially true in organized conservation. Historical analyses of the Progressive conservation era and the period following to the New Deal have understated women's organized participation in conservation. Through an analysis of Women's Clubs' records, newspapers, and magazines from 1900-1932, Arizona clubwomen's activities regarding natural resources are examined. The clubwomen are found to have been mutually and simultaneously supportive of conservation, preservation, civic improvement, nature study, and recreation--antagonistic issues at differing times. They reconciled those conflicts by advocating management solutions based upon resource renewability. Behind a shield of patriotism, maternalism, and housekeeping, the clubwomen used resource conservation to encourage a healthy future for humans and the environment. Conservation also served to advance their status as women through community service and self-education.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cortner, Hanna J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEarly conservation by the Arizona Federation of Women's Clubs from 1900 to 1932en_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Sandra Jeanne, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Sandra Jeanne, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWomen have been historically written out of human achievement. This is especially true in organized conservation. Historical analyses of the Progressive conservation era and the period following to the New Deal have understated women's organized participation in conservation. Through an analysis of Women's Clubs' records, newspapers, and magazines from 1900-1932, Arizona clubwomen's activities regarding natural resources are examined. The clubwomen are found to have been mutually and simultaneously supportive of conservation, preservation, civic improvement, nature study, and recreation--antagonistic issues at differing times. They reconciled those conflicts by advocating management solutions based upon resource renewability. Behind a shield of patriotism, maternalism, and housekeeping, the clubwomen used resource conservation to encourage a healthy future for humans and the environment. Conservation also served to advance their status as women through community service and self-education.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCortner, Hanna J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356795en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31454410en_US
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