Family members' temporal perception and mood during an open heart surgery waiting experience

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278368
Title:
Family members' temporal perception and mood during an open heart surgery waiting experience
Author:
Mahn, Victoria Ann, 1959-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study described how 25 subjects experienced time and mood during a waiting experience for relatives undergoing open heart surgery. Using the 40 Second Production Method to measure "time estimation", sixty percent of the total group "overestimated" waiting time. Significant differences found between groups were associated with education, gender and prior waiting experience in the setting. Using the Time Metaphor Test, 22 subjects perceived time passage as "static". No significant correlation was found between Time Metaphor scores and reading time. The mood for the group as a whole tended to be more negative as compared to normative samples. Subjects who perceived time as passing more swiftly, scored significantly higher on "confusion" and "fatigue", and lower on "vigor" compared to "static" subjects. While findings are interpreted with caution given the small sample, the results of the study suggest that altered time perception may be adaptive to the stress associated with anticipated crisis.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Psychology, Psychometrics.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reed, Pamela G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFamily members' temporal perception and mood during an open heart surgery waiting experienceen_US
dc.creatorMahn, Victoria Ann, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMahn, Victoria Ann, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study described how 25 subjects experienced time and mood during a waiting experience for relatives undergoing open heart surgery. Using the 40 Second Production Method to measure "time estimation", sixty percent of the total group "overestimated" waiting time. Significant differences found between groups were associated with education, gender and prior waiting experience in the setting. Using the Time Metaphor Test, 22 subjects perceived time passage as "static". No significant correlation was found between Time Metaphor scores and reading time. The mood for the group as a whole tended to be more negative as compared to normative samples. Subjects who perceived time as passing more swiftly, scored significantly higher on "confusion" and "fatigue", and lower on "vigor" compared to "static" subjects. While findings are interpreted with caution given the small sample, the results of the study suggest that altered time perception may be adaptive to the stress associated with anticipated crisis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychometrics.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1355153en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b30896381en_US
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