Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278353
Title:
Phytosociology of oak woodlands in the southwestern United States
Author:
Mehlert, Svenje, 1969-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study compared the effects of sampling metrics (basal area, density) on community structure analyses. Additionally, an oak woodland classification system was developed from the basal area data for the southwestern United States. Minimum-variance clustering was used to define communities within the oak woodlands. The communities defined by basal area data were more evenly distributed, showed more distinct communities, and were more homogeneous than the density-based communities. Thirteen communities were identified in the classification of oak woodlands, with mean basal area varying by an order of magnitude. Elevation had a major influence on the distribution of the communities.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, Guy R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePhytosociology of oak woodlands in the southwestern United Statesen_US
dc.creatorMehlert, Svenje, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMehlert, Svenje, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study compared the effects of sampling metrics (basal area, density) on community structure analyses. Additionally, an oak woodland classification system was developed from the basal area data for the southwestern United States. Minimum-variance clustering was used to define communities within the oak woodlands. The communities defined by basal area data were more evenly distributed, showed more distinct communities, and were more homogeneous than the density-based communities. Thirteen communities were identified in the classification of oak woodlands, with mean basal area varying by an order of magnitude. Elevation had a major influence on the distribution of the communities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1353676en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b29225267en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.