An exploration of Mexican-American women's likelihood of adopting cancer screening behaviors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278352
Title:
An exploration of Mexican-American women's likelihood of adopting cancer screening behaviors
Author:
Maynard, Katharine Adele, 1956-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Value-expectancy theory was used with 32 Mexican-American women to investigate whether the likelihood of following cancer screening guidelines was a function of perceived effectiveness and difficulty of the behaviors. Participants used magnitude estimation techniques to rate 10 recommended cancer screening behaviors with respect to perceived effectiveness, difficulty, and likelihood of adoption. Standard correlation and regression analysis were conducted on the means of the natural logs of the raw scores. Results indicated both perceived effectiveness and perceived difficulty were significant predictors of likelihood of taking action (R² =.71, p ≤ .005). Unlike previous Anglo samples in which effectiveness was not a significant factor in intent to act, this group of Mexican-American women gave approximately equal importance to effectiveness and difficulty. A curvilinear relationship between difficulty and likelihood is common to this and all previous studies: the sharply decelerating curve indicates that likelihood decreases rapidly with increasing difficulty.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sennott-Miller, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn exploration of Mexican-American women's likelihood of adopting cancer screening behaviorsen_US
dc.creatorMaynard, Katharine Adele, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMaynard, Katharine Adele, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractValue-expectancy theory was used with 32 Mexican-American women to investigate whether the likelihood of following cancer screening guidelines was a function of perceived effectiveness and difficulty of the behaviors. Participants used magnitude estimation techniques to rate 10 recommended cancer screening behaviors with respect to perceived effectiveness, difficulty, and likelihood of adoption. Standard correlation and regression analysis were conducted on the means of the natural logs of the raw scores. Results indicated both perceived effectiveness and perceived difficulty were significant predictors of likelihood of taking action (R² =.71, p ≤ .005). Unlike previous Anglo samples in which effectiveness was not a significant factor in intent to act, this group of Mexican-American women gave approximately equal importance to effectiveness and difficulty. A curvilinear relationship between difficulty and likelihood is common to this and all previous studies: the sharply decelerating curve indicates that likelihood decreases rapidly with increasing difficulty.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSennott-Miller, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1353675en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2922522xen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.