Finite element and analytical methods for analyzing interfacial thermal resistance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278334
Title:
Finite element and analytical methods for analyzing interfacial thermal resistance
Author:
Kaufmann, Matthew Vernon, 1969-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this thesis, the phenomena of thermal contact resistance is examined from both an analytical and numerical standpoint. Strong emphasis is made on the differentiation between the macroscopic and microscopic mechanisms and their separate effects on the thermal resistance at the interface of two unbonded materials. Of particular interest is the interface between two dissimilar materials. A full analysis of the macroscopic influence of thermal strains on the deformations at the interface is presented. The dependence of interfacial thermal resistance on the direction of heat flow is explained. The theory of microscopic-based contact resistance is also reviewed. A computer code enabling coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analyses of models was developed to investigate the complex interplay between thermal strains, interface separation, and contact conductance. The program is used to examine past and current methods of experimentally determining thermal contact resistance. A unique procedure, based on observed interfacial phenomena, for experimentally measuring true thermal contact resistance is presented and numerically verified. Finally, the technology developed in this thesis is used to analyze some interface problems in electronic packages.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Applied Mechanics.; Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Simon, Bruce R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFinite element and analytical methods for analyzing interfacial thermal resistanceen_US
dc.creatorKaufmann, Matthew Vernon, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaufmann, Matthew Vernon, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, the phenomena of thermal contact resistance is examined from both an analytical and numerical standpoint. Strong emphasis is made on the differentiation between the macroscopic and microscopic mechanisms and their separate effects on the thermal resistance at the interface of two unbonded materials. Of particular interest is the interface between two dissimilar materials. A full analysis of the macroscopic influence of thermal strains on the deformations at the interface is presented. The dependence of interfacial thermal resistance on the direction of heat flow is explained. The theory of microscopic-based contact resistance is also reviewed. A computer code enabling coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analyses of models was developed to investigate the complex interplay between thermal strains, interface separation, and contact conductance. The program is used to examine past and current methods of experimentally determining thermal contact resistance. A unique procedure, based on observed interfacial phenomena, for experimentally measuring true thermal contact resistance is presented and numerically verified. Finally, the technology developed in this thesis is used to analyze some interface problems in electronic packages.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectApplied Mechanics.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSimon, Bruce R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1353104en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27589146en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.