Interpersonal and intrapersonal variables predicting early adolescent substance use: A risk factor model

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278317
Title:
Interpersonal and intrapersonal variables predicting early adolescent substance use: A risk factor model
Author:
Vazsonyi, Alexander Thomas, 1964-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined early adolescent risk for substance use in a sample of 1,170 sixth and seventh graders. Risk was assessed by inspecting the predictive strength of thirteen continuous variables from the interpersonal (peer pressure, peer substance use, parental monitoring, parent-child involvement, academic achievement, and school adjustment) and intrapersonal (self efficacy, impulsivity, withdrawal, depression, somatization, delinquency, and aggression) domains. Consistent with expectations, mean levels of substance use did not differ by gender or ethnicity (Caucasians and Hispanics). In addition, model-free LISREL analyses revealed underlying process similarity of predictors between sixth and seventh graders and between Caucasians and Hispanics. Interpersonal variables accounted for significantly more variance in early adolescent lifetime substance use than intrapersonal variables (39% versus 25%). Finally, weighting continuous independent predictors did not meaningfully improve prediction of lifetime substance use. The importance of process similarity and the significance of the peer domain in early adolescent substance use are discussed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, General.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Flannery, Daniel J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInterpersonal and intrapersonal variables predicting early adolescent substance use: A risk factor modelen_US
dc.creatorVazsonyi, Alexander Thomas, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorVazsonyi, Alexander Thomas, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined early adolescent risk for substance use in a sample of 1,170 sixth and seventh graders. Risk was assessed by inspecting the predictive strength of thirteen continuous variables from the interpersonal (peer pressure, peer substance use, parental monitoring, parent-child involvement, academic achievement, and school adjustment) and intrapersonal (self efficacy, impulsivity, withdrawal, depression, somatization, delinquency, and aggression) domains. Consistent with expectations, mean levels of substance use did not differ by gender or ethnicity (Caucasians and Hispanics). In addition, model-free LISREL analyses revealed underlying process similarity of predictors between sixth and seventh graders and between Caucasians and Hispanics. Interpersonal variables accounted for significantly more variance in early adolescent lifetime substance use than intrapersonal variables (39% versus 25%). Finally, weighting continuous independent predictors did not meaningfully improve prediction of lifetime substance use. The importance of process similarity and the significance of the peer domain in early adolescent substance use are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFlannery, Daniel J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1352388en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27056405en_US
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