The hydrology and plant community relations of Canelo Hills Cienega, an emergent wetland in southeastern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278293
Title:
The hydrology and plant community relations of Canelo Hills Cienega, an emergent wetland in southeastern Arizona
Author:
Davis, Judith Camisa, 1960-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An important wetland type in the southwestern United States requiring study is the cienega. Cienega is a Spanish term used for wetlands found in semi-arid grasslands, associated with perennial springs and headwater streams. A field study was conducted at Canelo Hills Cienega in Southeastern Arizona for one year in which changes in water levels, soil water content, and stream flow were monitored. Plant composition, soil classification, and basic geological characteristics were determined as well. Water level fluctuations and flow gradients indicate that this cienega is mostly groundwater dependent and is an effluent system maintaining the perennial nature of the adjacent stream. Mean water levels ranged from.9 cm above the surface to 0.85 m below. Water level fluctuation within the cienega ranged from 1.12 m/yr to 0.18 m/yr. Vegetation occurred in distinct patterns which varied across the cienega in relation to water levels and availability. Dominant genera included Eleocharis, Carex, Juncus, Poa, and Bidens.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Botany.; Hydrology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Guertin, D. Phillip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe hydrology and plant community relations of Canelo Hills Cienega, an emergent wetland in southeastern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorDavis, Judith Camisa, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Judith Camisa, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn important wetland type in the southwestern United States requiring study is the cienega. Cienega is a Spanish term used for wetlands found in semi-arid grasslands, associated with perennial springs and headwater streams. A field study was conducted at Canelo Hills Cienega in Southeastern Arizona for one year in which changes in water levels, soil water content, and stream flow were monitored. Plant composition, soil classification, and basic geological characteristics were determined as well. Water level fluctuations and flow gradients indicate that this cienega is mostly groundwater dependent and is an effluent system maintaining the perennial nature of the adjacent stream. Mean water levels ranged from.9 cm above the surface to 0.85 m below. Water level fluctuation within the cienega ranged from 1.12 m/yr to 0.18 m/yr. Vegetation occurred in distinct patterns which varied across the cienega in relation to water levels and availability. Dominant genera included Eleocharis, Carex, Juncus, Poa, and Bidens.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Botany.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1352350en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27051262en_US
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