Studies on mechanisms of delayed puberty in female rats effected by dietary eicosapentaenoic acid

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278267
Title:
Studies on mechanisms of delayed puberty in female rats effected by dietary eicosapentaenoic acid
Author:
Zhang, Zhao, 1960-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Marine oils contain eicosapentaenoic acid, a fatty acid that competes for cyclooxygenase and reduces the synthesis of dienoic prostanoids including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Since PGE2 plays an important role in the release of hypothalamic GnRH and the maturation of ovarian follicles and ova release, it was postulated that a diet containing fish oil (FO) would delay first ovulation through inhibitory effects on GnRH release, follicle development and ovulation. Immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a FO diet ad libitum. Controls were pair-fed an identical diet with the substitution of safflower oil. The age of the FO-fed rats was significantly increased at first estrus, and first ovulation was either delayed or inhibited. Preoptic area/hypothalamic and ovarian PGE2 levels were reduced by FO feeding whereas hypothalamic GnRH was significantly increased. A FO-containing diet may delay the onset of puberty through attenuation of preovulatory GnRH release and local impairment of the ovulatory process.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Anatomy.; Biology, Animal Physiology.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Benson, Bryant

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStudies on mechanisms of delayed puberty in female rats effected by dietary eicosapentaenoic aciden_US
dc.creatorZhang, Zhao, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zhao, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMarine oils contain eicosapentaenoic acid, a fatty acid that competes for cyclooxygenase and reduces the synthesis of dienoic prostanoids including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Since PGE2 plays an important role in the release of hypothalamic GnRH and the maturation of ovarian follicles and ova release, it was postulated that a diet containing fish oil (FO) would delay first ovulation through inhibitory effects on GnRH release, follicle development and ovulation. Immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a FO diet ad libitum. Controls were pair-fed an identical diet with the substitution of safflower oil. The age of the FO-fed rats was significantly increased at first estrus, and first ovulation was either delayed or inhibited. Preoptic area/hypothalamic and ovarian PGE2 levels were reduced by FO feeding whereas hypothalamic GnRH was significantly increased. A FO-containing diet may delay the onset of puberty through attenuation of preovulatory GnRH release and local impairment of the ovulatory process.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Anatomy.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBenson, Bryanten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1351360en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27149079en_US
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