An empirical test of the relationship between expectations, language intensity, and gender

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278263
Title:
An empirical test of the relationship between expectations, language intensity, and gender
Author:
Massey, Joseph Eric, 1964-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Burgoon and colleagues have applied Expectancy Theory to the study of language intensity, arguing that a complex pattern of effects can be explained in terms of the expectations people hold for sources of persuasive communication. It is argued in this paper, however, that because expectations have not been directly examined, Expectancy Theory has not provided a fair test of hypotheses. The current investigation aims to alleviate this problem by determining whether expectations people have for male and female sources of persuasive communication do in fact differ. Using a variety of message topics, expectations for male and female sources were investigated by asking respondents to provide the language choices they thought would be most effective for male and female authors of persuasive communication. What the results suggest is that both men and women should utilize moderate to high intense language to be optimally effective in suasory attempts.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jackson, Sally

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn empirical test of the relationship between expectations, language intensity, and genderen_US
dc.creatorMassey, Joseph Eric, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMassey, Joseph Eric, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBurgoon and colleagues have applied Expectancy Theory to the study of language intensity, arguing that a complex pattern of effects can be explained in terms of the expectations people hold for sources of persuasive communication. It is argued in this paper, however, that because expectations have not been directly examined, Expectancy Theory has not provided a fair test of hypotheses. The current investigation aims to alleviate this problem by determining whether expectations people have for male and female sources of persuasive communication do in fact differ. Using a variety of message topics, expectations for male and female sources were investigated by asking respondents to provide the language choices they thought would be most effective for male and female authors of persuasive communication. What the results suggest is that both men and women should utilize moderate to high intense language to be optimally effective in suasory attempts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Sallyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1351351en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27148415en_US
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