Ion flux through a shallow snowpack: Effects of initial and melt conditions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278260
Title:
Ion flux through a shallow snowpack: Effects of initial and melt conditions
Author:
Petersen, Christian E., 1962-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Six intermediate-scale experiments were performed to determine the effects of melt rate, melt-freeze cycles, and initial chemical distribution on the timing and magnitude of the ionic pulse from a physically homogeneous snowpack. The greatest ionic concentration in the initial snowmelt resulted when long melt-freeze cycles were applied to a chemically homogeneous snowpack. Low melt rates resulted in faster initial ion removal than did high melt rates. Chemical species applied in a layer at mid pack were removed slower than species applied as a layer on the top. Sulfate and NO₃⁻ were consistently removed in preference to Cl⁻. Three ice-sphere experiments showed that the preferential release of SO₄⁻ and NO₃⁻ over Cl⁻ is influenced by microscale effects. In each case, SO₄⁻ and NO₃⁻ were rejected from the ice-crystal lattice to a greater extent than was Cl⁻, facilitating their early removal at the onset of melt.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hydrology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bales, Roger C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIon flux through a shallow snowpack: Effects of initial and melt conditionsen_US
dc.creatorPetersen, Christian E., 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Christian E., 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSix intermediate-scale experiments were performed to determine the effects of melt rate, melt-freeze cycles, and initial chemical distribution on the timing and magnitude of the ionic pulse from a physically homogeneous snowpack. The greatest ionic concentration in the initial snowmelt resulted when long melt-freeze cycles were applied to a chemically homogeneous snowpack. Low melt rates resulted in faster initial ion removal than did high melt rates. Chemical species applied in a layer at mid pack were removed slower than species applied as a layer on the top. Sulfate and NO₃⁻ were consistently removed in preference to Cl⁻. Three ice-sphere experiments showed that the preferential release of SO₄⁻ and NO₃⁻ over Cl⁻ is influenced by microscale effects. In each case, SO₄⁻ and NO₃⁻ were rejected from the ice-crystal lattice to a greater extent than was Cl⁻, facilitating their early removal at the onset of melt.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341284en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26341591en_US
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