Clinical decision making about end-of-life decisions of persons over 65: Perceptions of clinicians

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278251
Title:
Clinical decision making about end-of-life decisions of persons over 65: Perceptions of clinicians
Author:
Palmer, Barbara Benson, 1958-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A descriptive study was conducted to explore whether or not there were any differences in perceptions of physicians, acute care nurses, long-term care nurses, and nurse practitioners associated with end-of-life decision making for people over 65 years of age. A convenience sample of 95 health care providers, all of whom were involved in direct patient care was used. Quantitative research techniques were employed for data collection and analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between four individual items on the CDMS and the health care providers. It was found that long-term care nurses believed items associated with pain and suffering, and culture to be more important than either physicians or acute care nurses, where as they found physicians input less important. A statistical significance was also found between the years spent in practice by health care providers and scores on the CDMS.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gerontology.; Health Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheehy, Christine M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleClinical decision making about end-of-life decisions of persons over 65: Perceptions of cliniciansen_US
dc.creatorPalmer, Barbara Benson, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Barbara Benson, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA descriptive study was conducted to explore whether or not there were any differences in perceptions of physicians, acute care nurses, long-term care nurses, and nurse practitioners associated with end-of-life decision making for people over 65 years of age. A convenience sample of 95 health care providers, all of whom were involved in direct patient care was used. Quantitative research techniques were employed for data collection and analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between four individual items on the CDMS and the health care providers. It was found that long-term care nurses believed items associated with pain and suffering, and culture to be more important than either physicians or acute care nurses, where as they found physicians input less important. A statistical significance was also found between the years spent in practice by health care providers and scores on the CDMS.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheehy, Christine M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1351338en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26868349en_US
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