Some factors influencing myoglobin derivatives on refrigerated packaged beef

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278237
Title:
Some factors influencing myoglobin derivatives on refrigerated packaged beef
Author:
Ben Abdallah, Mheni, 1963-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of microbial growth, packaging film permeability, and freezing on the discoloration of beef was assessed by measuring myoglobin derivatives and specifically the rate of formation of metmyoglobin on the surface of Longissimus dorsi and Semimembranosus bovine muscles during 12 days of storage at 2°C. Frozen thawed sterile beef samples experienced higher metmyoglobin formation than fresh sterile beef samples. By day 2, up to 20% metmyoglobin was formed in the thawed samples whereas, the fresh samples reached this value after day 6. After 6 days, the growth of Pseudomonas florescence had a significant effect on myoglobin oxidation and this behavior continued for the remaining period of the storage. Gas barrier film and gas permeable film exhibited similar results at day 0 and day 3 of storage, however at day 6 of storage, samples packaged with the gas barrier film showed metmyoglobin percentage significantly higher that those packaged with gas permeable film. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Food Science and Technology.; Biology, Microbiology.; Engineering, Packaging.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marchello, John A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSome factors influencing myoglobin derivatives on refrigerated packaged beefen_US
dc.creatorBen Abdallah, Mheni, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBen Abdallah, Mheni, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of microbial growth, packaging film permeability, and freezing on the discoloration of beef was assessed by measuring myoglobin derivatives and specifically the rate of formation of metmyoglobin on the surface of Longissimus dorsi and Semimembranosus bovine muscles during 12 days of storage at 2°C. Frozen thawed sterile beef samples experienced higher metmyoglobin formation than fresh sterile beef samples. By day 2, up to 20% metmyoglobin was formed in the thawed samples whereas, the fresh samples reached this value after day 6. After 6 days, the growth of Pseudomonas florescence had a significant effect on myoglobin oxidation and this behavior continued for the remaining period of the storage. Gas barrier film and gas permeable film exhibited similar results at day 0 and day 3 of storage, however at day 6 of storage, samples packaged with the gas barrier film showed metmyoglobin percentage significantly higher that those packaged with gas permeable film. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Food Science and Technology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Packaging.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarchello, John A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1351315en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27120442en_US
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