Comparative behavior and physiology of feral and domestic honeybees, Apis mellifera L.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278225
Title:
Comparative behavior and physiology of feral and domestic honeybees, Apis mellifera L.
Author:
Atmowidjojo, Anita Hanna, 1951-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
To determine if temperature and water conservation/collection play a significant role in the success of feral honeybees, experiments in foraging behavior, temperature tolerance, water balance, hemolymph osmolality regulation and uric acid concentrations of both feral and domestic bees were conducted. This study shows that feral honeybees collect larger volumes of liquid and have higher critical thermal maxima (CTMs) than domestic honeybees. Feral bees may need more liquid for thermoregulation than do domestic bees. The rate of water loss did not differ significantly between the two types of honeybees. Hemolymph osmolality was slightly significant lower in feral bees. In response to desiccation, both feral and domestic bees showed reduced concentrations of proteins and amino acids in the blood. Therefore both types of honeybees maintained hemolymph osmolality during desiccation. There were no differences in mean concentrations of uric acid in feral vs domestic bees and no difference as a result of desiccation. This indicates that uric acid is regulated but is not an osmoeffector.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wheeler, Diana E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleComparative behavior and physiology of feral and domestic honeybees, Apis mellifera L.en_US
dc.creatorAtmowidjojo, Anita Hanna, 1951-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAtmowidjojo, Anita Hanna, 1951-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo determine if temperature and water conservation/collection play a significant role in the success of feral honeybees, experiments in foraging behavior, temperature tolerance, water balance, hemolymph osmolality regulation and uric acid concentrations of both feral and domestic bees were conducted. This study shows that feral honeybees collect larger volumes of liquid and have higher critical thermal maxima (CTMs) than domestic honeybees. Feral bees may need more liquid for thermoregulation than do domestic bees. The rate of water loss did not differ significantly between the two types of honeybees. Hemolymph osmolality was slightly significant lower in feral bees. In response to desiccation, both feral and domestic bees showed reduced concentrations of proteins and amino acids in the blood. Therefore both types of honeybees maintained hemolymph osmolality during desiccation. There were no differences in mean concentrations of uric acid in feral vs domestic bees and no difference as a result of desiccation. This indicates that uric acid is regulated but is not an osmoeffector.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWheeler, Diana E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1350842en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27746379en_US
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