An empirical test of the effects of commercial advertisements on consumer recall: A schema theory application

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278210
Title:
An empirical test of the effects of commercial advertisements on consumer recall: A schema theory application
Author:
Dileo, Desiree Lynn, 1968-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation sought to bridge the communication and marketing fields by applying schema theory (Bartlett, 1932) to advertisement information processing. A theoretical framework was developed which described how television commercials are remembered. Specifically, the theory hypothesized that: (a) recall of product brand will be significantly higher in the sample of participants who are exposed to the commercials emphasizing brand early on in their format, than the participants who view the commercials stating the product's brand name in the latter half of the commercials, and (b) individuals who see the brand name formatted commercials will have significantly higher levels of commercial information recognition than the individuals exposed to the commercials that do not state the brand name at the onset. The results of the study provided intial support for the proposed framework and suggested that brand name formatted commercials will generally enhance recall and significantly impact recognition.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Psychology, Social.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kenski, Hank

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn empirical test of the effects of commercial advertisements on consumer recall: A schema theory applicationen_US
dc.creatorDileo, Desiree Lynn, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDileo, Desiree Lynn, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation sought to bridge the communication and marketing fields by applying schema theory (Bartlett, 1932) to advertisement information processing. A theoretical framework was developed which described how television commercials are remembered. Specifically, the theory hypothesized that: (a) recall of product brand will be significantly higher in the sample of participants who are exposed to the commercials emphasizing brand early on in their format, than the participants who view the commercials stating the product's brand name in the latter half of the commercials, and (b) individuals who see the brand name formatted commercials will have significantly higher levels of commercial information recognition than the individuals exposed to the commercials that do not state the brand name at the onset. The results of the study provided intial support for the proposed framework and suggested that brand name formatted commercials will generally enhance recall and significantly impact recognition.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKenski, Hanken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1350778en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b25469320en_US
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