Dislodgement of bacteria from endotracheal tubes after saline instillation and suction catheter insertion

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278191
Title:
Dislodgement of bacteria from endotracheal tubes after saline instillation and suction catheter insertion
Author:
Hagler, Debra Ann, 1960-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Bacterial glycocalyx formations on the inner lumens of endotracheal tubes may be dislodged into the lower airway by suction catheter insertions or saline instillations. Repeated introduction of bacteria into the lower airway may overwhelm host defense mechanisms, leading to nosocomial pneumonia. Ten crossover subjects required intubation for 2 to 39 days. A range of 0-62,000 (mean 26,980) viable bacterial colonies per milliliter was dislodged from freshly removed endotracheal tubes by either catheter insertion or saline instillation. There was no significant difference in numbers of viable bacteria dislodged from endotracheal tubes by catheter insertion versus a 5 milliliter saline instillation. The large numbers of coated bacteria dislodged could be an underestimated infectious hazard, particularly as endotracheal suctioning is generally performed multiple times each day for intubated patients. As optional saline instillations have not improved endotracheal suctioning outcomes in previous studies, caregivers should consider deleting saline instillation during endotracheal suctioning.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Traver, Gayle A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDislodgement of bacteria from endotracheal tubes after saline instillation and suction catheter insertionen_US
dc.creatorHagler, Debra Ann, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHagler, Debra Ann, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBacterial glycocalyx formations on the inner lumens of endotracheal tubes may be dislodged into the lower airway by suction catheter insertions or saline instillations. Repeated introduction of bacteria into the lower airway may overwhelm host defense mechanisms, leading to nosocomial pneumonia. Ten crossover subjects required intubation for 2 to 39 days. A range of 0-62,000 (mean 26,980) viable bacterial colonies per milliliter was dislodged from freshly removed endotracheal tubes by either catheter insertion or saline instillation. There was no significant difference in numbers of viable bacteria dislodged from endotracheal tubes by catheter insertion versus a 5 milliliter saline instillation. The large numbers of coated bacteria dislodged could be an underestimated infectious hazard, particularly as endotracheal suctioning is generally performed multiple times each day for intubated patients. As optional saline instillations have not improved endotracheal suctioning outcomes in previous studies, caregivers should consider deleting saline instillation during endotracheal suctioning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTraver, Gayle A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1349480en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27702455en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.