Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278185
Title:
Improved thermometry system for ultrasound hyperthermia
Author:
Lim, Chuck Mang, 1963-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A thermometry system for use during ultrasound hyperthermia treatments was developed to provide fast and reliable temperature measurements such that transient temperatures from multi-sensor thermocouples could be measured. It was also intended to provide electrical isolation for patient safety when bare thermocouple sensors were used in order to reduce artifacts. The system hardware development involved fabrication of a high precision temperature measurement box which was electrically isolated from, by an opto-isolation unit, and interfaced with, an 386-20 MHz personal computer. The system software development involved a two point calibration program for each thermocouple probe to be used with the system, and a sensor locating program to rapidly identify the probe locations immediately prior to treatment. A single scan temperature reading speed of 0.2 sec for all 112 thermocouple sensors with an average accuracy of ±0.05°C under normal operating conditions (ambient temperature 22°C to 28°C) was achieved. A probe to earth ground leakage sink current of 75 μA and a leakage source current of less than 10 μA was attained.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Health Sciences, Radiology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tharp, Hal S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImproved thermometry system for ultrasound hyperthermiaen_US
dc.creatorLim, Chuck Mang, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLim, Chuck Mang, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA thermometry system for use during ultrasound hyperthermia treatments was developed to provide fast and reliable temperature measurements such that transient temperatures from multi-sensor thermocouples could be measured. It was also intended to provide electrical isolation for patient safety when bare thermocouple sensors were used in order to reduce artifacts. The system hardware development involved fabrication of a high precision temperature measurement box which was electrically isolated from, by an opto-isolation unit, and interfaced with, an 386-20 MHz personal computer. The system software development involved a two point calibration program for each thermocouple probe to be used with the system, and a sensor locating program to rapidly identify the probe locations immediately prior to treatment. A single scan temperature reading speed of 0.2 sec for all 112 thermocouple sensors with an average accuracy of ±0.05°C under normal operating conditions (ambient temperature 22°C to 28°C) was achieved. A probe to earth ground leakage sink current of 75 μA and a leakage source current of less than 10 μA was attained.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Radiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTharp, Hal S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1349473en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27699092en_US
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