Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278170
Title:
Older healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast cancer
Author:
McNamara, Nancy Taylor, 1961-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An exploratory descriptive design was used to investigate older healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast cancer. A secondary analysis of a database from a larger study dealing with Hispanic and Anglo women's knowledge of breast cancer and use of breast cancer screening was conducted. Using Orem's theory of self-care and self-care deficit as the framework, and content analysis, data were obtained from a two part question of the original 63 item questionnaire. A major finding was that hopelessness/powerlessness received the largest number of responses, especially from the youngest subjects, 50 to 69 years old. The seventy year olds had the largest number of responses in the acceptance category, while the eighty year olds had the largest in the denial category. The results supported the importance of culturally relevant and sensitive nursing practice. Reasons for older healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast cancer are discussed as well as recommendations for nursing practice and future research.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Longman, Alice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOlder healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast canceren_US
dc.creatorMcNamara, Nancy Taylor, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Nancy Taylor, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn exploratory descriptive design was used to investigate older healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast cancer. A secondary analysis of a database from a larger study dealing with Hispanic and Anglo women's knowledge of breast cancer and use of breast cancer screening was conducted. Using Orem's theory of self-care and self-care deficit as the framework, and content analysis, data were obtained from a two part question of the original 63 item questionnaire. A major finding was that hopelessness/powerlessness received the largest number of responses, especially from the youngest subjects, 50 to 69 years old. The seventy year olds had the largest number of responses in the acceptance category, while the eighty year olds had the largest in the denial category. The results supported the importance of culturally relevant and sensitive nursing practice. Reasons for older healthy Hispanic women's beliefs about breast cancer are discussed as well as recommendations for nursing practice and future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLongman, Aliceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1349452en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27691184en_US
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