Influence of exercise intensity and nasal flow resistance on activities of human nasal dilator muscles

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278156
Title:
Influence of exercise intensity and nasal flow resistance on activities of human nasal dilator muscles
Author:
Connel, Diane Carol, 1962-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ten healthy subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer at 60, 120, and 150-180 W while breathing nasally. Nasal inspiratory flow, nasal dilator muscle (alae nasi; A.N.) EMG activities, and alveolar CO₂ and O₂ were measured at rest and at each work rate. On separate days six of the subjects exercised at 30-60, and 60-120 W while nasal airway resistance was measured by anterior rhinomanometry. In both protocols, 12-15 breaths of a He:O₂ (79:21%) gas mixture were substituted surreptitiously for air under each condition. He:O₂ breathing resulted in a decrease in flow turbulence and intranasal pressure, and therefore, resistance, as indicated by lower calculated Reynold's numbers. He:O₂ evoked an increase in nasal inspiratory flow, and reductions in nasal pressure and A.N. EMG activities (25-50%) at each work rate. These results suggest that A.N. EMG during exercise is controlled by increases in intranasal pressure, not by nasal flow. Thus, the data suggest that sensory information from pressure sensitive nasal receptors in the nasal lumen serve to modulate A.N. EMG activities during exercise.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Animal Physiology.; Health Sciences, General.; Health Sciences, Recreation.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fregosi, Ralph F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInfluence of exercise intensity and nasal flow resistance on activities of human nasal dilator musclesen_US
dc.creatorConnel, Diane Carol, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorConnel, Diane Carol, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTen healthy subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer at 60, 120, and 150-180 W while breathing nasally. Nasal inspiratory flow, nasal dilator muscle (alae nasi; A.N.) EMG activities, and alveolar CO₂ and O₂ were measured at rest and at each work rate. On separate days six of the subjects exercised at 30-60, and 60-120 W while nasal airway resistance was measured by anterior rhinomanometry. In both protocols, 12-15 breaths of a He:O₂ (79:21%) gas mixture were substituted surreptitiously for air under each condition. He:O₂ breathing resulted in a decrease in flow turbulence and intranasal pressure, and therefore, resistance, as indicated by lower calculated Reynold's numbers. He:O₂ evoked an increase in nasal inspiratory flow, and reductions in nasal pressure and A.N. EMG activities (25-50%) at each work rate. These results suggest that A.N. EMG during exercise is controlled by increases in intranasal pressure, not by nasal flow. Thus, the data suggest that sensory information from pressure sensitive nasal receptors in the nasal lumen serve to modulate A.N. EMG activities during exercise.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, General.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Recreation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFregosi, Ralph F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1349125en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27629697en_US
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