The courtship and mating behavior of the round stingray, Urolophus halleri

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278149
Title:
The courtship and mating behavior of the round stingray, Urolophus halleri
Author:
Nordell, Shawn Elizabeth, 1957-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Biting has been observed to be an important component of male mating behavior in several elasmobranch species. I observed male biting during courtship and mating in a population of Urolophus halleri, the round stingray, in the Sea of Cortez. Females allow males to bite the posterior and medial edge of their pectoral fin during courtship yet often appear to struggle to dislodge the male after they have been bitten. During mating the male bites the anterior edge of the females' pectoral fin and the female is passive. In response to this biting behavior females have relatively thicker discs than males and males have sexually dimorphic dentition. Larger adult males have relatively smaller yet more sharply curved teeth than smaller males that may allow them to hold on to females better during courtship. Therefore there is the potential for assortative mating based on male dentition and his ability to hold a female.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Oceanography.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Thomson, Donald A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe courtship and mating behavior of the round stingray, Urolophus hallerien_US
dc.creatorNordell, Shawn Elizabeth, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNordell, Shawn Elizabeth, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBiting has been observed to be an important component of male mating behavior in several elasmobranch species. I observed male biting during courtship and mating in a population of Urolophus halleri, the round stingray, in the Sea of Cortez. Females allow males to bite the posterior and medial edge of their pectoral fin during courtship yet often appear to struggle to dislodge the male after they have been bitten. During mating the male bites the anterior edge of the females' pectoral fin and the female is passive. In response to this biting behavior females have relatively thicker discs than males and males have sexually dimorphic dentition. Larger adult males have relatively smaller yet more sharply curved teeth than smaller males that may allow them to hold on to females better during courtship. Therefore there is the potential for assortative mating based on male dentition and his ability to hold a female.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Oceanography.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorThomson, Donald A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341282en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26341578en_US
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