Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278137
Title:
Anthropology, sustainability and the case of Mexico's sea turtles
Author:
Piper, Jessie Celeste, 1950-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mexico was formerly an important breeding ground for six marine turtle species. Over the last several decades, overexploitation of turtles for their meat, eggs, and hides, as well as habitat destruction, has led to alarming rates of decline in all species. The problem of sea turtle conservation is a promising area for questions of anthropology and sustainable human systems because decline of these species is related to unsustainable development and subsistence practices that have disenfranchised small coastal fishing cooperatives. Common property resource theory aids the analysis of the context in which overexploitation takes place. Conserving sea turtles will depend on the development of localized institutions for managing natural resources in perpetuity and for negotiating the array of regional, national, and global factors relevant to sea turtle endangerment and preservation. Anthropology can play a vital role in this process of developing sustainable interactions between human subsistence needs and natural resource conservation.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Biology, Ecology.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Netting, Robert M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAnthropology, sustainability and the case of Mexico's sea turtlesen_US
dc.creatorPiper, Jessie Celeste, 1950-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Jessie Celeste, 1950-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMexico was formerly an important breeding ground for six marine turtle species. Over the last several decades, overexploitation of turtles for their meat, eggs, and hides, as well as habitat destruction, has led to alarming rates of decline in all species. The problem of sea turtle conservation is a promising area for questions of anthropology and sustainable human systems because decline of these species is related to unsustainable development and subsistence practices that have disenfranchised small coastal fishing cooperatives. Common property resource theory aids the analysis of the context in which overexploitation takes place. Conserving sea turtles will depend on the development of localized institutions for managing natural resources in perpetuity and for negotiating the array of regional, national, and global factors relevant to sea turtle endangerment and preservation. Anthropology can play a vital role in this process of developing sustainable interactions between human subsistence needs and natural resource conservation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNetting, Robert M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348514en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27590392en_US
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