The effect of shading on air conditioning use of quarter-scale model buildings

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278130
Title:
The effect of shading on air conditioning use of quarter-scale model buildings
Author:
Ryan, Linda Elizabeth, 1939-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of vegetation to block shortwave radiation can reduce cooling loads in hot climates. From July 22nd, 1989 to October 7, 1989, this study, using shade cloth to simulate vegetative canopies, compared the electricity used for air conditioning between quarter-scale models. The treatments were: (1) canopies of the same density on east, west, and/or south walls, (2) wall canopies versus roof canopies of the same density, (3) wall canopies of different densities, and (4) roof canopies of different densities. Although the savings in electricity in any treatment was usually less than 11%, the results showed: dense canopies gave better savings than medium canopies, which, in turn, gave better savings than the least dense canopies; wall canopies gave better results than a roof canopy; an east wall canopy gave better results than a west wall canopy; and shading all walls except the north gave better results than shading only the east and west wall.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Architecture.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.L.Arch.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, E. G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of shading on air conditioning use of quarter-scale model buildingsen_US
dc.creatorRyan, Linda Elizabeth, 1939-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Linda Elizabeth, 1939-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of vegetation to block shortwave radiation can reduce cooling loads in hot climates. From July 22nd, 1989 to October 7, 1989, this study, using shade cloth to simulate vegetative canopies, compared the electricity used for air conditioning between quarter-scale models. The treatments were: (1) canopies of the same density on east, west, and/or south walls, (2) wall canopies versus roof canopies of the same density, (3) wall canopies of different densities, and (4) roof canopies of different densities. Although the savings in electricity in any treatment was usually less than 11%, the results showed: dense canopies gave better savings than medium canopies, which, in turn, gave better savings than the least dense canopies; wall canopies gave better results than a roof canopy; an east wall canopy gave better results than a west wall canopy; and shading all walls except the north gave better results than shading only the east and west wall.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, E. G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348504en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27588920en_US
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