Coping strategies used by patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in Taiwan

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278122
Title:
Coping strategies used by patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in Taiwan
Author:
Chao, Hsiao-Chuang, 1961-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Coping has been implicated in health outcomes through a process of adaptation. The purpose of this study was to describe the coping strategies used by 37 patients undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis treatment in Taiwan. The Jalowiec Coping Scale was used to measure the use and effect of patients' coping styles. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Seven commonly used coping strategies and three never used coping strategies were reported. Subjects also reported six not helpful coping strategies. Results of t-tests indicated that there was a significant difference (p < .05) between those with a supportive person and those without. Several significant correlations (p < .05) were found between coping styles and demographic factors. Finally, the results of 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (p < .05) in the main effect of support, gender, and interaction in total effect of the Jalowiec Coping Scale.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Longman, Alice J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCoping strategies used by patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in Taiwanen_US
dc.creatorChao, Hsiao-Chuang, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorChao, Hsiao-Chuang, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCoping has been implicated in health outcomes through a process of adaptation. The purpose of this study was to describe the coping strategies used by 37 patients undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis treatment in Taiwan. The Jalowiec Coping Scale was used to measure the use and effect of patients' coping styles. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Seven commonly used coping strategies and three never used coping strategies were reported. Subjects also reported six not helpful coping strategies. Results of t-tests indicated that there was a significant difference (p < .05) between those with a supportive person and those without. Several significant correlations (p < .05) were found between coping styles and demographic factors. Finally, the results of 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (p < .05) in the main effect of support, gender, and interaction in total effect of the Jalowiec Coping Scale.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLongman, Alice J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348489en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27584483en_US
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