Detection of decontamination solution chelating agents using ion selective coated-wire electrodes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278120
Title:
Detection of decontamination solution chelating agents using ion selective coated-wire electrodes
Author:
Banks, Mark Lavoir, 1960-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
It is the purpose of this thesis to explore the feasibility of using coated-wire electrodes to measure chelating agent concentration. Chelating agents are often found in radioactive decontamination solutions because they aid in the removal of radionuclides from contaminated surfaces by increasing their solubility. However, this characteristic will also enhance the mobility of the radionuclide and thus its transport out of a waste disposal site. Coated-wire ion selective electrodes, based on a polyvinylchloride membrane using dioctylphthalate as a plasticizer and dinonylnaphthalene-sulfonic acid as a counterion, were constructed for five commonly utilized chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid). The EDTA and NTA electrodes' calibration characteristics exhibited acceptable behavior in pure standard solutions. From data obtained while using the EDTA and NTA electrodes in a cement environment, further research needs to be done in the area of ion interference.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Analytical.; Engineering, Nuclear.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wacks, Morton E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDetection of decontamination solution chelating agents using ion selective coated-wire electrodesen_US
dc.creatorBanks, Mark Lavoir, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Mark Lavoir, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is the purpose of this thesis to explore the feasibility of using coated-wire electrodes to measure chelating agent concentration. Chelating agents are often found in radioactive decontamination solutions because they aid in the removal of radionuclides from contaminated surfaces by increasing their solubility. However, this characteristic will also enhance the mobility of the radionuclide and thus its transport out of a waste disposal site. Coated-wire ion selective electrodes, based on a polyvinylchloride membrane using dioctylphthalate as a plasticizer and dinonylnaphthalene-sulfonic acid as a counterion, were constructed for five commonly utilized chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid). The EDTA and NTA electrodes' calibration characteristics exhibited acceptable behavior in pure standard solutions. From data obtained while using the EDTA and NTA electrodes in a cement environment, further research needs to be done in the area of ion interference.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Analytical.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Nuclear.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWacks, Morton E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348487en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27584240en_US
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