Tracer experiments using bromide ion and two bacteriophages during soil aquifer treatment studies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278114
Title:
Tracer experiments using bromide ion and two bacteriophages during soil aquifer treatment studies
Author:
Cline, David James, 1956-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The fate and transport of a conservative and two bacteriophage tracers during Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) has been examined. A 12 foot x 12 foot mini-basin containing seven stainless steel suction samplers ranging in depth from 1 to 20 feet below land surface was constructed in an existing recharge basin. Bromide ion and MS-2 and PRD-1 virus tracers were introduced into the mini-basin during recharge of secondary effluent during three of nine flooding cycles in order to aid in interpreting transport processes and to determine the presence of preferred-flow channels. High infiltration rates and discontinuous impeding layers resulted in 150 feet of horizontal transport. Preferential-flow channels were observed in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Less removal of bacteriophage MS-2 (hydrophilic, 28 nm dia) was observed at all depths compared to PRD-1 (hydrophobic, 62 nm dia). Results suggest that the fate of the virus transport in sandy alluvium is determined by the size and hydrophobicity of the viral particles, the quality of the percolating fluid, and composition of the soils.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hydrology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wilson, L. G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTracer experiments using bromide ion and two bacteriophages during soil aquifer treatment studiesen_US
dc.creatorCline, David James, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCline, David James, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe fate and transport of a conservative and two bacteriophage tracers during Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) has been examined. A 12 foot x 12 foot mini-basin containing seven stainless steel suction samplers ranging in depth from 1 to 20 feet below land surface was constructed in an existing recharge basin. Bromide ion and MS-2 and PRD-1 virus tracers were introduced into the mini-basin during recharge of secondary effluent during three of nine flooding cycles in order to aid in interpreting transport processes and to determine the presence of preferred-flow channels. High infiltration rates and discontinuous impeding layers resulted in 150 feet of horizontal transport. Preferential-flow channels were observed in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Less removal of bacteriophage MS-2 (hydrophilic, 28 nm dia) was observed at all depths compared to PRD-1 (hydrophobic, 62 nm dia). Results suggest that the fate of the virus transport in sandy alluvium is determined by the size and hydrophobicity of the viral particles, the quality of the percolating fluid, and composition of the soils.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, L. G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348481en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27580611en_US
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