The effect of the Breastfeeding Support Team (BEST) Program on the initiation and longevity of breastfeeding in WIC clients in Tucson, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278107
Title:
The effect of the Breastfeeding Support Team (BEST) Program on the initiation and longevity of breastfeeding in WIC clients in Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Walsh, Lisa Regina, 1958-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Breastfeeding Education Support Team (BEST) is a pilot project to promote breastfeeding in WIC clients in Tucson, Arizona. In this study, the control group breastfed their infants significantly longer than the intervention group (p < .006). Ethnicity and perceived support were shown to positively affect breastfeeding longevity in the control group. The intervention did increase the probability that a client receiving it would initiate breastfeeding (p < 0.06). The trimester a client attended the BEST class did significantly affect the longevity of breastfeeding in the intervention group (p < 0.016). The control group appeared to be influenced by cultural norms that favor breastfeeding. The intervention group seems to be functioning under transitional influences that do not favor breastfeeding. Strategies that include the BEST class, homevisiting a new breastfeeding mother, and the formation of breastfeeding support groups could increase the initiation and longevity of breastfeeding in this population.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheehan, Edward T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of the Breastfeeding Support Team (BEST) Program on the initiation and longevity of breastfeeding in WIC clients in Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorWalsh, Lisa Regina, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Lisa Regina, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Breastfeeding Education Support Team (BEST) is a pilot project to promote breastfeeding in WIC clients in Tucson, Arizona. In this study, the control group breastfed their infants significantly longer than the intervention group (p < .006). Ethnicity and perceived support were shown to positively affect breastfeeding longevity in the control group. The intervention did increase the probability that a client receiving it would initiate breastfeeding (p < 0.06). The trimester a client attended the BEST class did significantly affect the longevity of breastfeeding in the intervention group (p < 0.016). The control group appeared to be influenced by cultural norms that favor breastfeeding. The intervention group seems to be functioning under transitional influences that do not favor breastfeeding. Strategies that include the BEST class, homevisiting a new breastfeeding mother, and the formation of breastfeeding support groups could increase the initiation and longevity of breastfeeding in this population.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheehan, Edward T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348469en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2757054xen_US
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