The behavioral and physiological effects of low-flying aircraft on desert ungulates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278096
Title:
The behavioral and physiological effects of low-flying aircraft on desert ungulates
Author:
Weisenberger, Mara Enyeart, 1966-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I evaluated the effects of simulated noise from low-flying jet aircraft on the behavior and physiology of 6 captive desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) and 5 captive mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana). I measured heart rate, body temperature, ambient temperature, and behavior related to the number of overflights/day, and decibel levels (dB) animals were exposed to (range = 92-112). I recorded heart rate and body temperatures from transmitters implanted into the body cavity of animals. Ambient temperature was recorded in the pens and behavior was described from visual observations. I compared heart rates during simulated overflights by jet aircraft (N = 112/season) of sheep and deer to data collected prior to and following treatments. I documented differences between heart rates, species, dB levels, and number of overflights/day within and between seasons. All animals became habituated to aircraft noise. Although heart rates increased during overflights, they returned to the resting heart rate in ≤ 2 minutes.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Biology, Zoology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe behavioral and physiological effects of low-flying aircraft on desert ungulatesen_US
dc.creatorWeisenberger, Mara Enyeart, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeisenberger, Mara Enyeart, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI evaluated the effects of simulated noise from low-flying jet aircraft on the behavior and physiology of 6 captive desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) and 5 captive mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana). I measured heart rate, body temperature, ambient temperature, and behavior related to the number of overflights/day, and decibel levels (dB) animals were exposed to (range = 92-112). I recorded heart rate and body temperatures from transmitters implanted into the body cavity of animals. Ambient temperature was recorded in the pens and behavior was described from visual observations. I compared heart rates during simulated overflights by jet aircraft (N = 112/season) of sheep and deer to data collected prior to and following treatments. I documented differences between heart rates, species, dB levels, and number of overflights/day within and between seasons. All animals became habituated to aircraft noise. Although heart rates increased during overflights, they returned to the resting heart rate in ≤ 2 minutes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348450en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27566651en_US
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