Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278044
Title:
The determination of protein-acetaldehyde adducts in alcoholism
Author:
Seeto, Kei Fong, 1961-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, has been shown to bind to proteins to form protein-acetaldehyde adducts in vivo and in vitro. The effects of acetaldehyde have been implicated in diseases associated with alcoholism. In the present study, we have extended the observations by studying three different protein-acetaldehyde adducts in vitro, and hair keratin-acetaldehyde adduct in alcohol-fed mice in vivo. Our studies reported here suggest that our enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is able to detect the stable protein-acetaldehyde adducts. In our preliminary application of the indirect ELISA assay in the chronically alcohol-fed mice, we found that there were significantly increased levels of hair keratin-acetaldehyde adducts in the 5-week alcohol group, 8-week alcohol group, including different alcohol diet groups, compared to the normal control group. We suggest that our indirect ELISA assay has a potential as a biochemical parameter for alcoholism in the clinical settings, although the further study should be performed. Fluorescent techniques, including fluorescent HPLC and fluorescent spectrophotometry were also discussed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Toxicology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Watson, Ronald R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe determination of protein-acetaldehyde adducts in alcoholismen_US
dc.creatorSeeto, Kei Fong, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeeto, Kei Fong, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAcetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, has been shown to bind to proteins to form protein-acetaldehyde adducts in vivo and in vitro. The effects of acetaldehyde have been implicated in diseases associated with alcoholism. In the present study, we have extended the observations by studying three different protein-acetaldehyde adducts in vitro, and hair keratin-acetaldehyde adduct in alcohol-fed mice in vivo. Our studies reported here suggest that our enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is able to detect the stable protein-acetaldehyde adducts. In our preliminary application of the indirect ELISA assay in the chronically alcohol-fed mice, we found that there were significantly increased levels of hair keratin-acetaldehyde adducts in the 5-week alcohol group, 8-week alcohol group, including different alcohol diet groups, compared to the normal control group. We suggest that our indirect ELISA assay has a potential as a biochemical parameter for alcoholism in the clinical settings, although the further study should be performed. Fluorescent techniques, including fluorescent HPLC and fluorescent spectrophotometry were also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Toxicology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWatson, Ronald R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346712en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27252541en_US
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