Goals and career progress of female community college honors graduates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278043
Title:
Goals and career progress of female community college honors graduates
Author:
Layne, Kimberly Dawn, 1968-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study presents information gathered from a follow-up survey of 124 female community college honors graduates from the years 1989, 1990, and 1991. Results are intended to provide descriptive information in understanding the role that successful completion of community college education plays in the career development of women. Participants provided information via a questionnaire regarding demographics, factors related to academic success, choice of major, current education and employment status, and career and educational goals for the future. Results indicate that female community college honors graduates are likely to be reentry women who have career related goals. One to three years after graduation, the women are employed full-time, studying for bachelors degrees, or working in the home. It appears that community colleges provide women with an opportunity to achieve formal education at virtually every life stage. Conclusions and implications are drawn for career counselors and community college personnel.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Community College.; Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGoals and career progress of female community college honors graduatesen_US
dc.creatorLayne, Kimberly Dawn, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLayne, Kimberly Dawn, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study presents information gathered from a follow-up survey of 124 female community college honors graduates from the years 1989, 1990, and 1991. Results are intended to provide descriptive information in understanding the role that successful completion of community college education plays in the career development of women. Participants provided information via a questionnaire regarding demographics, factors related to academic success, choice of major, current education and employment status, and career and educational goals for the future. Results indicate that female community college honors graduates are likely to be reentry women who have career related goals. One to three years after graduation, the women are employed full-time, studying for bachelors degrees, or working in the home. It appears that community colleges provide women with an opportunity to achieve formal education at virtually every life stage. Conclusions and implications are drawn for career counselors and community college personnel.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Community College.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346709en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27252486en_US
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