Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278042
Title:
Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs
Author:
Tandon, Rohit, 1966-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little value because the gas storage and flow mechanisms in coal are remarkably different. Field observations suggest that the gas productivity does not decline with time as expected. An increasing permeability is a possible explanation. This laboratory study is aimed at measuring the volumetric changes in coal matrix resulting from gas desorption, its impact on coal porosity and permeability, and an estimate of the stage when the effect is significant. Results using cylindrical samples of coal suggest that coal matrix shrinks with desorption of gas. The shrinkage is linearly proportional to the quantity of gas desorbed. Using the measured changes in matrix volume, variations in total and cleat porosity were estimated and found to increase significantly with desorption. These changes should, therefore, be used as input when simulating long-term gas production.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Engineering, Mining.; Engineering, Petroleum.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harpalani, Satya

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirsen_US
dc.creatorTandon, Rohit, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTandon, Rohit, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little value because the gas storage and flow mechanisms in coal are remarkably different. Field observations suggest that the gas productivity does not decline with time as expected. An increasing permeability is a possible explanation. This laboratory study is aimed at measuring the volumetric changes in coal matrix resulting from gas desorption, its impact on coal porosity and permeability, and an estimate of the stage when the effect is significant. Results using cylindrical samples of coal suggest that coal matrix shrinks with desorption of gas. The shrinkage is linearly proportional to the quantity of gas desorbed. Using the measured changes in matrix volume, variations in total and cleat porosity were estimated and found to increase significantly with desorption. These changes should, therefore, be used as input when simulating long-term gas production.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mining.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Petroleum.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarpalani, Satyaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346707en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27252462en_US
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