Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants by thermal liquefaction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278014
Title:
Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants by thermal liquefaction
Author:
Girdner, Kirstin Kay, 1965-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Plans for development of human colonies on the Moon, Mars or other planets will require the investigation of new structural materials. In order to foster self-sufficiency and to make the colonies economically feasible, materials must be developed from locally available resources when possible. In this investigation a material made from a lunar soil simulant has been developed and tested for its mechanical properties. The simulant was mixed with varying percentages of aluminum, stainless steel and carbon steel fibers and heated to 1100°C to form a solid material. Beam shaped samples were cut from these specimens for bending tests. From the intact portions of the tested beams, samples for compression testing were cut and tested. Analysis of the results includes bending strength, compressive strength, and investigation of elastic moduli. The material was found to have significant strength in bending and compression. Results indicate the presence of fibers significantly changes the behavior of the material.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Civil.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Desai, C. S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants by thermal liquefactionen_US
dc.creatorGirdner, Kirstin Kay, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGirdner, Kirstin Kay, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlans for development of human colonies on the Moon, Mars or other planets will require the investigation of new structural materials. In order to foster self-sufficiency and to make the colonies economically feasible, materials must be developed from locally available resources when possible. In this investigation a material made from a lunar soil simulant has been developed and tested for its mechanical properties. The simulant was mixed with varying percentages of aluminum, stainless steel and carbon steel fibers and heated to 1100°C to form a solid material. Beam shaped samples were cut from these specimens for bending tests. From the intact portions of the tested beams, samples for compression testing were cut and tested. Analysis of the results includes bending strength, compressive strength, and investigation of elastic moduli. The material was found to have significant strength in bending and compression. Results indicate the presence of fibers significantly changes the behavior of the material.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Civil.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDesai, C. S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346436en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27227157en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.