A psychobiological exploration of mental rotation in three groups of children: Control, learning disabled, and Down syndrome

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278013
Title:
A psychobiological exploration of mental rotation in three groups of children: Control, learning disabled, and Down syndrome
Author:
Uecker, Anne Cantalupo, 1960-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study investigated anomalous hemispheric processing for language and its impact on spatial task performance. Mental rotation and dichotic listening tasks were administered to three groups of children: control (C), learning disabled (LD), and Down syndrome (DS). Significant differences were found in reaction time and accuracy measures in mental rotation. Although the DS group lacked a systematic reaction time function, all three groups produced similar accuracy functions: each group appeared to demonstrate difficulty at equivalent angular disorientations. Dichotic listening resulted in performance differences only when the DS group was compared to the C and LD groups: discrepant language processing was not demonstrated between the C and LD groups. Conclusions could not be reached regarding the impact of language lateralization on spatial task performance. Inconsistencies of neuropsychological measurements are discussed; the topic of mental rotation is explored in depth. Generalizations regarding performance outcomes are limited to a behavioral level.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Psychobiology.; Education, Special.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nadel, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA psychobiological exploration of mental rotation in three groups of children: Control, learning disabled, and Down syndromeen_US
dc.creatorUecker, Anne Cantalupo, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorUecker, Anne Cantalupo, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated anomalous hemispheric processing for language and its impact on spatial task performance. Mental rotation and dichotic listening tasks were administered to three groups of children: control (C), learning disabled (LD), and Down syndrome (DS). Significant differences were found in reaction time and accuracy measures in mental rotation. Although the DS group lacked a systematic reaction time function, all three groups produced similar accuracy functions: each group appeared to demonstrate difficulty at equivalent angular disorientations. Dichotic listening resulted in performance differences only when the DS group was compared to the C and LD groups: discrepant language processing was not demonstrated between the C and LD groups. Conclusions could not be reached regarding the impact of language lateralization on spatial task performance. Inconsistencies of neuropsychological measurements are discussed; the topic of mental rotation is explored in depth. Generalizations regarding performance outcomes are limited to a behavioral level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346433en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27227121en_US
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