Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278001
Title:
Kingship festival iconography in the Egyptian Archaic Period
Author:
Dochniak, Craig Charles, 1964-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The high degree of correlation existing between the subject matter visually depicted on Early Dynastic Egyptian objects and the year-names represented hieroglyphically on the Palermo Stone--an historical annal from the Fifth Dynasty--suggests that much Early Dynastic imagery was meant to serve as a dating device, a kind of pictorial year-name, based on the important event or events that occurred within the year. The selection of the historic events referred to in these year-names appears to be based on their compatibility with certain festivals associated with the king. These festivals express the theoretical model of kingship and therefore can be used to reconstruct the king's primary roles and responsibilities during the Early Dynastic Period. Such duties include the unification, protection and expansion of the king's realm--both Earthly and Cosmic; the insuring of the irrigation and fertility of the land; the foundation and dedication of important buildings and temples; and the reaffirmation and magical rejuvenation of his primeval powers as expressed in such festivals as the Sed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Art History.; History, Ancient.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McElroy, Keith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleKingship festival iconography in the Egyptian Archaic Perioden_US
dc.creatorDochniak, Craig Charles, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDochniak, Craig Charles, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe high degree of correlation existing between the subject matter visually depicted on Early Dynastic Egyptian objects and the year-names represented hieroglyphically on the Palermo Stone--an historical annal from the Fifth Dynasty--suggests that much Early Dynastic imagery was meant to serve as a dating device, a kind of pictorial year-name, based on the important event or events that occurred within the year. The selection of the historic events referred to in these year-names appears to be based on their compatibility with certain festivals associated with the king. These festivals express the theoretical model of kingship and therefore can be used to reconstruct the king's primary roles and responsibilities during the Early Dynastic Period. Such duties include the unification, protection and expansion of the king's realm--both Earthly and Cosmic; the insuring of the irrigation and fertility of the land; the foundation and dedication of important buildings and temples; and the reaffirmation and magical rejuvenation of his primeval powers as expressed in such festivals as the Sed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Ancient.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcElroy, Keithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346418en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27226554en_US
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