Post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology in a traumatically injured population

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277990
Title:
Post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology in a traumatically injured population
Author:
Clark, Susanne Jane, 1956-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between non-combat traumatic injury and the occurrence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomatology. The animal model of inescapable shock (IS) provided a physiological rationale for the nursing interventions discussed relative to decreasing the negative impact of a traumatic injury. Traumatically injured subjects (n = 33) completed the Modified Late Effects of Accidental Injury Questionnaire, Part I (MLEAIQ-I) to assess any late negative effects subsequent to the traumatic injury, Part II (MLEAIQ-II) to measure the incidence of symptomatology associated with PTSD, and the Revised Impact of Event Scale (RIES) to measure PTSD symptomatology as defined by intrusion and avoidance experiences. No statistically significant relationships were found between PTSD symptomatology and subject injury severity, length of hospital stay, or subject reported late negative effects from a traumatic injury. However, the level of PTSD symptomatology among the subjects was moderate to high.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Psychology, Psychobiology.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crosby, Leanna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePost-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology in a traumatically injured populationen_US
dc.creatorClark, Susanne Jane, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Susanne Jane, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between non-combat traumatic injury and the occurrence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomatology. The animal model of inescapable shock (IS) provided a physiological rationale for the nursing interventions discussed relative to decreasing the negative impact of a traumatic injury. Traumatically injured subjects (n = 33) completed the Modified Late Effects of Accidental Injury Questionnaire, Part I (MLEAIQ-I) to assess any late negative effects subsequent to the traumatic injury, Part II (MLEAIQ-II) to measure the incidence of symptomatology associated with PTSD, and the Revised Impact of Event Scale (RIES) to measure PTSD symptomatology as defined by intrusion and avoidance experiences. No statistically significant relationships were found between PTSD symptomatology and subject injury severity, length of hospital stay, or subject reported late negative effects from a traumatic injury. However, the level of PTSD symptomatology among the subjects was moderate to high.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrosby, Leannaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346135en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27179497en_US
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