Increased bacterial uptake of macromolecular substrates with fluid shear

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277985
Title:
Increased bacterial uptake of macromolecular substrates with fluid shear
Author:
Confer, David Ray, 1956-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
To investigate the effect of fluid shear on uptake rates of low diffusivity macromolecular substrates by suspended cultures, I measured the radiolabel and oxygen uptake of two model compounds, bovine serum albumin and dextran, in pure cultures of Zoogloea ramigera and E. coli, respectively. Oxygen utilization rates of stirred samples grown on BSA and dextran were 2.3 and 2.9 times higher, respectively, than undisturbed (still) samples. Uptake rates of (3H) BSA and (3H) dextran by stirred samples were 12.6 and 6.2 times higher, respectively, than still samples. These experimentally obtained increases are larger than increases predicted using a mass transfer model. The mass transfer model predicts uptake rate will increase by a factor of 1.6 and 1.8 for BSA and dextran, respectively, as a result of stirring. Uptake rates of low-molecular-weight substrates with high diffusivities, such as leucine and glucose, were only slightly affected by fluid shear. Since macromolecules can comprise a major portion of bacterial substrate in engineered, laboratory, and natural systems, the demonstrated effect of fluid shear has wide implications for the evaluation of engineered bioreactors used for wastewater treatment as well as for kinetic studies performed in basic metabolic research.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Microbiology.; Engineering, Civil.; Engineering, Sanitary and Municipal.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Logan, Bruce E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIncreased bacterial uptake of macromolecular substrates with fluid shearen_US
dc.creatorConfer, David Ray, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorConfer, David Ray, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the effect of fluid shear on uptake rates of low diffusivity macromolecular substrates by suspended cultures, I measured the radiolabel and oxygen uptake of two model compounds, bovine serum albumin and dextran, in pure cultures of Zoogloea ramigera and E. coli, respectively. Oxygen utilization rates of stirred samples grown on BSA and dextran were 2.3 and 2.9 times higher, respectively, than undisturbed (still) samples. Uptake rates of (3H) BSA and (3H) dextran by stirred samples were 12.6 and 6.2 times higher, respectively, than still samples. These experimentally obtained increases are larger than increases predicted using a mass transfer model. The mass transfer model predicts uptake rate will increase by a factor of 1.6 and 1.8 for BSA and dextran, respectively, as a result of stirring. Uptake rates of low-molecular-weight substrates with high diffusivities, such as leucine and glucose, were only slightly affected by fluid shear. Since macromolecules can comprise a major portion of bacterial substrate in engineered, laboratory, and natural systems, the demonstrated effect of fluid shear has wide implications for the evaluation of engineered bioreactors used for wastewater treatment as well as for kinetic studies performed in basic metabolic research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Civil.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Sanitary and Municipal.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLogan, Bruce E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346126en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2717928xen_US
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