Performance of annual medics (Medicago spp.) as limited by moisture availability and grass competition in southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277984
Title:
Performance of annual medics (Medicago spp.) as limited by moisture availability and grass competition in southern Arizona
Author:
Brahim, Kebe, 1953-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I investigated whether rapid-maturing medics (genus Medicago) could establish and produce seed under the relatively dry winter conditions of southern Arizona. Hardseededness is common in many medics and may limit germination before fall rains. Therefore, I was also interested in the amount of medic germination that occurred following summer rainfall. Five accessions from four Medicago species (laciniata, polymorpha, truncatula and littoralis) were sown with or without a companion grass (Oryzopsis hymenoides) and grown with or without weekly 2 cm irrigation. While single-plant forage yields were over 8 times higher with irrigation, each accession established and produced up to 14 seeds for every seed sown under rainfed conditions. The companion grass had no influence on medic performance. Natural reestablishment occurred in all accessions from pods. Seedlings established in summer did not survive to flowering. M. littoralis appeared particularly well adapted to establishment under rainfed conditions in this environment. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Agronomy.; Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Range Management.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, Steven E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePerformance of annual medics (Medicago spp.) as limited by moisture availability and grass competition in southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorBrahim, Kebe, 1953-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrahim, Kebe, 1953-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI investigated whether rapid-maturing medics (genus Medicago) could establish and produce seed under the relatively dry winter conditions of southern Arizona. Hardseededness is common in many medics and may limit germination before fall rains. Therefore, I was also interested in the amount of medic germination that occurred following summer rainfall. Five accessions from four Medicago species (laciniata, polymorpha, truncatula and littoralis) were sown with or without a companion grass (Oryzopsis hymenoides) and grown with or without weekly 2 cm irrigation. While single-plant forage yields were over 8 times higher with irrigation, each accession established and produced up to 14 seeds for every seed sown under rainfed conditions. The companion grass had no influence on medic performance. Natural reestablishment occurred in all accessions from pods. Seedlings established in summer did not survive to flowering. M. littoralis appeared particularly well adapted to establishment under rainfed conditions in this environment. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Range Management.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Steven E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346124en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27178663en_US
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