The electrophysiological characterization of phencyclidine analogs on ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277983
Title:
The electrophysiological characterization of phencyclidine analogs on ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons
Author:
Lin, Jingyang, 1962-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to characterize the effects of PCP and PCP derivatives on dopamine systems using electrophysiological and behavioral methods. TCP, a high affinity PCP/NMDA receptor ligand only increased A10 firing while BTCP, a high affinity DA reuptake ligand only decreased activity. PCP with similar affinity for the NMDA and reuptake sites, produced a dose dependent bimodal change in the activity of A10 neurons. Lesions of the nucleus accumbens or treatment with picrotoxin, a GABA antagonist attenuated the BTCP and high dose PCP inhibitory effects thus supporting the existence of a GABAergic accumbal-VTA feedback pathway. Furthermore, BTCP and PCP produced significant increases in locomotor activity which were attenuated by accumbens lesions. The present data provide an explanation for PCP's bimodal effects and possibly for its psychotomimetic properties as well as abuse liability which may reside with its blockade of dopamine reuptake in the mesolimbic system.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Pharmacology.; Psychology, Physiological.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
French, Edward D.; Nadel, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe electrophysiological characterization of phencyclidine analogs on ventral tegmental area dopamine neuronsen_US
dc.creatorLin, Jingyang, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Jingyang, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to characterize the effects of PCP and PCP derivatives on dopamine systems using electrophysiological and behavioral methods. TCP, a high affinity PCP/NMDA receptor ligand only increased A10 firing while BTCP, a high affinity DA reuptake ligand only decreased activity. PCP with similar affinity for the NMDA and reuptake sites, produced a dose dependent bimodal change in the activity of A10 neurons. Lesions of the nucleus accumbens or treatment with picrotoxin, a GABA antagonist attenuated the BTCP and high dose PCP inhibitory effects thus supporting the existence of a GABAergic accumbal-VTA feedback pathway. Furthermore, BTCP and PCP produced significant increases in locomotor activity which were attenuated by accumbens lesions. The present data provide an explanation for PCP's bimodal effects and possibly for its psychotomimetic properties as well as abuse liability which may reside with its blockade of dopamine reuptake in the mesolimbic system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Physiological.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFrench, Edward D.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341491en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26354676en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.